New Material

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This paper, written by Martin Davies, explores the similarities and differences between the different forms of mapping tools that are referred to as 'concept mapping', 'mind mapping', and 'argument mapping'. It offers an outline of the various types of tool available and their advantages and disadvantages and argues that the choice of mapping tool largely depends on the purpose or aim for which the tool is used and that the tools may well be converging to offer educators as yet unrealised and potentially complementary functions. Note, when discussing 'concept mapping', the paper refers to the Novak and Cañas method of concept mapping, not the Trochim version. See the Option page on Concept Mapping for more information.
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Written by Jackson and Trochim, this article presents concept mapping as an alternative method to existing codebased and word-based text analysis techniques for one type of qualitative text data—open-ended survey questions. It is argued that the concept mapping method offers a unique blending of the strengths of these approaches while minimizing some of their weaknesses. This method appears to be especially well suited for the type of text generated by open-ended questions as well for organizational research questions that are exploratory in nature and aimed at scale or interview question development and/or developing conceptual coding schemes. A detailed example of concept mapping on open-ended survey data is presented. Reliability and validity issues associated with concept mapping are also discussed. The article also offers a discussion of the different methodologies that share the name 'concept mapping' on page 312.
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There are a number of options when it comes to using software to help create a logic model. These range from generic word processing tools (Word, Powerpoint, or their Google Doc or Mac equivilants), to software that has been specifically tailored for visualising Theories of Change, like TOCO or Miradi. You should consider what resources you have to invest in software, both in terms of cost and in time to learn and use the features. If you only have a short timeframe and have simple needs, then a basic tool may suit you better than some of the more complex software available. It's important to investigate a few options and see what is going to be best for you.
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Theory of Change Online (TOCO) is web-based software (no download required) that you can use to design and edit and store your Theory of Change, learn the concepts of theory of change, and capture your outcomes, indicators, rationales and assumptions in an interactive graphical environment.
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An cloud-based flow chart maker with a number of usual features, including integration with programs like Visio.
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Miradi is designed to provide project teams with the essential features that they need to design, manage, monitor, and learn from their conservation projects in other words, to practice good adaptive management. Currently, most conservation practitioners go through the adaptive management process either using pen and paper, or by cobbling together functions from a wide range of programs including flowcharting, mapping, project planning, spreadsheet, accounting, and other software packages. Miradi takes the right functions from each of these different kinds of programs and bundles them together in one easy-to-use integrated package.

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