Blogs

52 weeks of BetterEvaluation: Week 16: Identifying and documenting emergent outcomes of a global network

Kornelia Rassmann's picture 12th April 2013 by Kornelia Rassmann

Global voluntary networks are complex beasts with dynamic and unpredictable actions and interactions. How can we evaluate the results of a network like this? Whose results are we even talking about?

52 weeks of BetterEvaluation: Week 15: Evaluation conferences 2013

Simon Hearn's picture 12th April 2013 by Simon Hearn

One of the most effective ways of learning about the evaluation field is to attend a conference, present your work and interact with other professionals.

This is why, this week, we are providing you with a round up of evaluation conferences taking place this year. We already talked about the Evaluation Conclave which took place in Kathmandu in February but there are many more taking place across the world.

52 weeks of BetterEvaluation: Week 13: Evaluation on a shoestring

Patricia Rogers's picture 27th March 2013 by Patricia Rogers

Many organisations are having to find ways of doing more for less – including doing evaluation with fewer resources. This can mean little money (or no money) to engage external expertise and a need to rely on resources internal to an organisation – specifically people who might also have less time to devote to evaluation.

Virtually attend development impact evaluation conference 26-27 March

Patricia Rogers's picture 25th March 2013 by Patricia Rogers

We’re delighted to be participating in this week’s conference - Impact, Innovation and Learning: Towards a Research and Practice Agenda for the Future - being held in conjunction with the launch of the Centre for Development Impact (CDI), a partnership between the Institute of Development Studies and ITAD.

52 weeks of BetterEvaluation: Week 12: Having an adequate theory of change

Patricia Rogers's picture 21st March 2013 by Patricia Rogers

Many evaluations use a theory of change approach, which identifies how activities are understood to contribute to a series of outcomes and impacts. These can help guide data collection, analysis and reporting. But what if the theory of change is has gaps, leaves out important things – or is just plain wrong?

Guest blog: Why rubrics are useful in evaluations

Judy Oakden's picture 13th March 2013 by Judy Oakden

In Aoteoroa New Zealand the use of rubrics has been adopted across a number of institutions to help ensure there is transparent and clear assessment which respects and includes diverse lines of evidence in evaluation. This case, written as part of the BetterEvaluation writeshop process, discusses how the use of rubrics was helpful throughout all stages of an evaluation of the First-time Principals’ Induction Programme.

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