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  1. Causal Attribution Video

    Resource
    Guide
    2014

    This video guide, produced by UNICEF, outlines three broad strategies for causal attribution: 1) estimating the counterfactual; 2) checking the consistency of evidence for the causal relationships made explicit in the theory of change; and 3) ruling out alternative explanations, through a logical, evidence-based process. 

  2. Rethinking Social Inquiry: Diverse Tools, Shared Standards (Second Edition)

    Resource
    Overview
    2010

    This second edition of Rethinking Social Inquiry has the aim of redirecting ongoing discussions of methodology in social and political science. The authors share a commitment to using diverse tools in the pursuit of research, and to shared standards for evaluating their use. The authors examine the relationship between quantitative and qualitative methods and focus on the study of causes and consequences, particularly on causal inference.

  3. UNICEF Webinar 4: Overview: Strategies for Causal Inference

    Resource
    2015

     What is causal attribution? Do you need a counterfactual to determine if something has caused a change?

    In webinar four of this series, Professor Patricia Rogers provides an overview of how to determine causal attribution in impact evaluations.

  4. Impact Evaluation A Guide for Commissioners and Managers

    Resource
    Guide
    2015

    This guide, written by Elliot Stern builds on an initial report prepared for the UK Department for International Development (DFID) Broadening the range of designs and methods for impact evaluations. The impetus for this guide came from a ‘cross-funders group’ interested in helping decision-makers within civil society organisations and those that fund them to better understand how to commission, manage and use impact evaluations. 

  5. Contemporary Thinking About Causation in Evaluation

    Resource
    Overview
    2010

    This paper was produced following a discussion between Thomas Cook and Michael Scriven held at The Evaluation Center and Western Michigan University’s Interdisciplinary PhD in Evaluation program jointly hosted Evaluation Cafe´ event on contemporary thinking about causation and causal inference in evaluation.