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  1. Broadening the range of designs and methods for impact evaluations

    Resource
    Overview
    2012

    The working paper, written by Elliot Stern, Nicoletta Stame, John Mayne, Kim Forss, Rick Davies, Barbara Befani for the UK Department for International Development (DFID)describes how Theory based, Case-based and Participatory options can be used in impact evaluations. These designs show promise to reinforce existing IE practice, including Experimental and Statistical designs, when dealing with complex programmes.

  2. Realist impact evaluation: an introduction

    Resource
    Guide
    2014

    Realist impact evaluation is an approach to impact evaluation that emphasises the importance of context for programme outcomes. This introduction will help evaluators and commissioners of evaluations to decide whether a realist approach is appropriate for evaluating the impact of a particular policy or programme.

  3. 3D Impact Analysis: A New Tool to Approach Impact Evaluations

    Resource
    Overview
    2015

    In this seminar, Rob D. van den Berg proposes an approach to ‘3D impact analysis’ which starts from the recognition that demand for impact evidence is wide ranging and should be analysed structurally before it can be met by evaluations. This will become more important with the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals that ask for a more holistic and integrated perspective of development.

  4. Straws-in-the-wind, Hoops and Smoking Guns: What can Process Tracing Offer to Impact Evaluation?

    Resource
    Overview
    2015

    This discussion paper, written by Melanie Punton and Katharina Welle, looks at the potential use of Process Tracing in an impact evaluation context. It examines the methodological and theoretical foundations of process tracing and examines two examples of its application in international development interventions.

  5. Addressing gender in impact evaluation

    Resource
    Guide
    2015

    “Gender affects everyone, all of the time. Gender affects the way we see each other, the way we interact, the institutions we create, the ways in which those institutions operate, and who benefits or suffers as a result of this.” (Fletcher 2015: 19)

    “Funding agencies around the world need interventions to address gender issues. This is because gender – or rather, judgements on worth related to gender – can result in inequality and injustice.” (Fletcher 2015: 4)

    A key question is ‘how should we assess the gender-related impact of interventions?’ In this new publication, Dr Fletcher provides a clear rationale for why an increase in the number of women participants in an intervention is not the same as demonstrating gender impact, and, collecting separate data on males and females (sex-disaggregated data) is not sufficient.

    This paper is a resource for practitioners and evaluators who want to include a genuine focus on gender impact when commissioning or conducting evaluations.

  6. Impact Evaluation Webinars for UNICEF

    Resource
    Overview
    2015

    An impact evaluation provides information about the impacts produced by an intervention. In development, government and philanthropy, there is increasing recognition of the potential value of impact evaluation and specific support to develop capacity for both commissioning and conducting impact evaluation, including the use of its findings. 

  7. Public Impact Fundamentals and Observatory

    Resource
    Example
    2016

    The Public Impact Fundamentals are a framework developed by the Centre for Public Impact to assess what makes a successful policy outcome and describe what can be done to maximise the chances of achieving public impact. The Fundamentals are complemented by the Centre's Public Impact Observatory - a library of hundreds of public policy case studies that have been analysed using the Fundamentals.

  8. I'm doing an impact evaluation: What evidence do I need? (#AES17 presentation slides)

    Resource
    Overview
    2017

    Are quantitative or qualitative methods better for undertaking impact evaluations? What about true experiments? Is contribution analysis the new 'state of the art' in impact evaluation or should I just do a survey and use statistical methods to create comparison groups?

    Determining one's plan for an impact evaluation occurs within the constraints of a specific context. Since method choices must always be context specific, debates in the professional literature about impact methods can at best only provide partial guidance to evaluation practitioners. The way to break out of this methods impasse is by focusing on the evidentiary requirements for assessing casual impacts.

  9. Impact Evaluation A Guide for Commissioners and Managers

    Resource
    Guide
    2015

    This guide, written by Elliot Stern builds on an initial report prepared for the UK Department for International Development (DFID) Broadening the range of designs and methods for impact evaluations. The impetus for this guide came from a ‘cross-funders group’ interested in helping decision-makers within civil society organisations and those that fund them to better understand how to commission, manage and use impact evaluations. 

  10. Overview: Strategies for Causal Attribution

    Resource
    Guide
    2014

    This guide, written by Patricia Rogers for UNICEF, looks at the process of causal attribution with a particular emphasis on its use in impact evaluation.  The guide specifically focuses on the three broad strategies for causal attribution: estimating the counterfactual; checking the consistency of evidence for the causal relationships made explicit in the theory of change; and ruling out alternative explanations, through a logical, evidence-based process. 

    Also Available In: Français, Español

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