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  1. Learning about Theories of Change for the Monitoring and Evaluation of Research Uptake

    Resource
    Example
    2013

    The paper, published by the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), captures lessons from recent experiences on using ‘theories of change’ amongst organisations involved in the research–policy interface.

  2. Program Logic / Theory of Change Training- November 6th – 7th 2014

    Event
    6th November, 2014 to 7th November, 2014
    Australia

    This workshop introduces the program logic concept and lays out a step by step process for creating a logic model. Program logic models illustrate the expected cause-and-effect relationships between activities, immediate changes, intermediate outcomes and final outcomes for a given program. Often represented as a diagram, a program logic model shows a series of expected consequences, not just a sequence of events. Articulating a program logic often requires 'backward mapping'.

  3. Theory of Change for Planning and Impact Assessment

    Event
    Course
    16th November, 2014
    United Kingdom
    Paid

    Interest in developing and using Theories of Change both for planning and assessing impact has grown rapidly over the last few years. Theories of Change can be set at different levels and are being used in a number of ways. At one end of the scale, they are pulled together by one person to support a programme proposal or a specific donor demand. At the other end, they are facilitated over a period of several months and include wide consultation with staff, partners and beneficiaries, and are used to inform strategy at all levels. As Theories of Change focus specifically on sequences of change for different target groups, they provide a clear and robust framework for monitoring and assessing the impact of our development efforts.

  4. Theory of Change for Planning and Impact Assessment

    Event
    Course
    15th March, 2015 to 19th March, 2015
    United Kingdom
    Paid

    Interest in developing and using Theories of Change both for planning and assessing impact has grown rapidly over the last few years. Theories of Change can be set at different levels and are being used in a number of ways. At one end of the scale, they are pulled together by one person to support a programme proposal or a specific donor demand. At the other end, they are facilitated over a period of several months and include wide consultation with staff, partners and beneficiaries, and are used to inform strategy at all levels. As Theories of Change focus specifically on sequences of change for different target groups, they provide a clear and robust framework for monitoring and assessing the impact of our development efforts.

  5. Advanced Program Logic / Theory of Change

    Event
    Course
    30th April, 2015 to 1st May, 2015
    Australia
    Paid

    This workshop is offered to experienced program logic/theory of change facilitators or those who have already attended several courses on this topic. If you have already mastered the basics and wish to find answers to more in-depth challenges or learn how to develop logic/ theory of change for more complex programs then this workshop is for you.

  6. Program Logic / Theory of Change

    Event
    Course
    14th October, 2015 to 15th October, 2015
    Australia
    Paid

    This workshop style training course introduces the program logic / theory of change concept and lays out a step by step process for creating a logic model for complex, multi-stakeholder programs. A program logic/ theory of change focuses not just on what, and how a project is trying to achieve change but also on the who will be changing. The course includes discussion of how program logic / theory of change can be used for program design and how it can be used to provide the structure for monitoring and evaluation plans.

  7. Learning about Theories of Change for the Monitoring and Evaluation of Research Uptake

    Resource
    Discussion paper
    2013

    This practice paper from IDS captures lessons from recent experiences on using ‘theories of change’ amongst organisations involved in the research–policy interface.

    The literature in this area highlights much of the complexity inherent in the policymaking process, as well as the challenges around finding meaningful ways to measure research uptake. As a tool, ‘theories of change’ offers much, but the paper argues that the very complexity and dynamism of the research-to-policy process means that any theory of change will be inadequate in this context. Therefore, rather than overcomplicating a static depiction of change at the start (to be evaluated at the end), incentives need to be in place to regularly collect evidence around the theory, test it periodically, and then reflect and reconsider its relevance and assumptions.

  8. BetterEvaluation FAQ: How do I choose a suitable theory of change?

    Blog
    22nd July, 2016

    We've been getting some great questions recently - so we're starting to share our answers through these blogs.  We'd welcome any additional suggestions for how to respond, or useful resources. Just add these to the comments box below.

    I’m wanting to do an impact evaluation. What kinds of theories should I use for developing a theory of change?

  9. BetterEvaluation FAQ: How can you get stakeholders to articulate how they think a program or project works?

    Blog
    29th July, 2016

    In our last newsletter we drew attention to our option page on Articulating Mental Models (part of the Develop program theory or logic model task), and asked the BetterEvaluation community: 

  10. Program Logic / Theory of Change (2 days)

    Event
    Workshop
    29th March, 2017 to 30th March, 2017
    Australia
    Paid

    This workshop style training course introduces the program logic / theory of change concept and a step by step process for creating a logic model for programs of all types and levels of complexity. A program logic/ theory of change focuses not just on how a project is trying to achieve change, and what kinds of change, but also on who needs to change. The course includes discussion of how program logic / theory of change can be used for program design and to provide the structure for monitoring and evaluation plans. 

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