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  1. Week 16: Infographics to make your evaluation results go viral

    Blog
    17th April, 2014

    Continuing our season of blogs on presenting evaluation findings in ways that will get them read (and hopefully used), Joitske Hulsebosch, an independent consultant, contributes her ideas on how to present your findings in the form of an infographic. Catch up on recent contributions from Rakesh Mohan and Patricia Rogers on sharing evaluation findings.

  2. BetterEvaluation 2018 Holiday Reading List

    Blog
    18th December, 2018

    Happy Holidays! As 2018 winds down we thought we'd share a list of resources for you to peruse over the holiday period. The selection includes some picks from the BetterEvaluation team, as well as some contributions from the BetterEvaluation community throughout 2018.

  3. 52 weeks of BetterEvaluation: Week 23: Tips for delivering negative results

    It’s a scenario many evaluators dread: the time has come to present your results to the commissioner, and you’ve got bad news. Failing to strike the right balance between forthrightness and diplomacy can mean you either don’t get your message across, or alienate your audience.

  4. Results from the poll: what should we include in Start Here?

    Blog
    20th September, 2013

    Two weeks ago I posted a poll asking BetterEvaluation users to select 1-4 topics they consider most important for the Start Here landing page. On behalf of the BetterEvaluation team, I would like to thank everyone for providing their feedback. The information we have received is very useful and we will be mindful of this while reworking the Start Here section.

    The results of the poll are presented in the graph below.

  5. 52 weeks of BetterEvaluation: Week 24: Choosing methods to describe activities, results and context

    Blog
    17th June, 2013

    How many methods do you usually see in evaluation reports as having been used to collect data? Chances are you’ll see project document review, key information interviews, surveys of some kind, and perhaps group interviews with intended beneficiaries. These methods are all useful to help describe what has happened, the outcomes and the context in which change occurred.

  6. Using logic models and theories of change better in evaluation

    Blog
    19th May, 2017

    Many evaluations include a process of developing logic models and theories of change – an explanation of how the activities of a program, project, policy, network or event are expected to contribute to particular results in the short-term and longer-term.  They have been used for many years -  versions can be seen in Carol Weiss’ 1972 book "Evaluation research: methods for assessing program effectiveness" -  and they have been mainstreamed in many organisations

  7. 52 weeks of BetterEvaluation: Week 20: Defining what needs to be evaluated

    Blog
    13th May, 2013

    Whether you are commissioning an evaluation, designing one or implementing one, having - and sharing - a very clear understanding of what is being evaluated is paramount. For complicated or complex interventions this isn't always as straight forward as it sounds, which is why BetterEvaluation offers specific guidance on options for doing this.

  8. Week 50: Feedback loops – new buzzword, old practice?

    Blog
    15th December, 2014

    Recently, I had the good fortune to start collaboration with The MasterCard Foundation, which is strongly committed to what it calls ‘listening deeply and elevating voices’. This organisation is one of an increasing number in international development expressing more than a superficial interest in ‘client feedback’.

  9. Week 22: Using evaluation in programme design – a funder’s perspective

    Blog
    3rd June, 2014

    Stephen Porter is Results and Evaluation Advisor for the Education and Partnerships team at DFID. In this blog he gives us a valuable insight into what a funder might be thinking as they review a development programme proposal and how he uses evaluation evidence to make funding decisions. In comparing the information that comes from (traditional) systematic reviews to that which comes from a realist synthesis, he urges us all to think hard about the ‘how’ of development interventions, particularly in livelihoods interventions.

  10. What do we mean by ‘impact’?

    Blog
    17th March, 2016

    International development is fixated with impact. But how do we know we’re all talking about the same thing?

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