AES

I'm doing an impact evaluation: What evidence do I need? (#AES17 presentation slides)

Are quantitative or qualitative methods better for undertaking impact evaluations? What about true experiments? Is contribution analysis the new 'state of the art' in impact evaluation or should I just do a survey and use statistical methods to create comparison groups?

Determining one's plan for an impact evaluation occurs within the constraints of a specific context. Since method choices must always be context specific, debates in the professional literature about impact methods can at best only provide partial guidance to evaluation practitioners. The way to break out of this methods impasse is by focusing on the evidentiary requirements for assessing casual impacts.

BetterEvaluation is going to AES17 - Come say hello !

Better-Admin's picture 15th August 2017 by Better-Admin

We're thrilled to be able to join the Australasian Evaluation Society at their 2017 International Conference in Canberra. We'll have a booth set up in the conference exhibition area and we'd love you to come say hello and join in the fun as we use our time at the AES to work with our members, website users, and the wider evaluation community to co-create and share knowledge about evaluation.

What would an evaluation conference look like if it was run by people who know and care about presenting information to support use? (hint - that should be us)

Patricia Rogers's picture 2nd March 2017 by Patricia Rogers

All too often conferences fail to make good use of the experience and knowledge of people attending, with most time spent presenting prepared material that could be better delivered other ways, and not enough time spent on discussions and active learning.  With closing dates for two evaluation conferences fast approaching (the Australasian Evaluation Society and the American Evaluation Association), could you propose something more useful, that would demonstrate how much we know and care about communicating and using information?