impact investing

Objectives-Based Evaluation (OBE) for impact investing

Bob Picciotto's picture 13th October 2020 by Bob Picciotto

Bob Picciotto is a former Director General of the Independent Evaluation Group which oversees evaluation in the International Finance Corporation, an agency dedicated to the promotion of private sector development in developing countries. In this guest blog, he argues that the ethical investment community has much to learn from the Objectives-Based Evaluation (OBE) approach used by the multilateral development banks: OBE rates social and environmental sustainability performance as well as economic and financial returns.

What Is Impact

This discussion paper discusses the meaning of 'impact', moving beyond methodological debates to present different perspectives and dimensions that can affect how impact could be framed and evaluated.

Better ways of choosing and using metrics in evaluation of impact investing

mishkahjakoet's picture 15th September 2020 by mishkahjakoet

We invited Mishkah Jakoet to share some thoughts on how metrics can be more useful for impact investing.  Mishkah brings considerable experience in evaluation for impact investing, including contributing to the revision of the IRIS+ indicators.

Launching the Working Capital Fund A Case Study of Humanity United

This is a case study of the start-up phase of the US $25 million Working Capital Investment Fund created to confront modern-day slavery by addressing forced labour in global supply chains. One chapter is a case study on 'learning while doing social finance' that details how developmental evaluation has been integrated into the operations of the fund.

Monitoring and Evaluation for Impact Investing

Impact investment aims to create positive social change alongside financial returns, thereby creating blended value. Impact investments differ from earlier forms of socially aligned or socially responsible investments in that the intention behind the impact investment is to have a positive effect on society as opposed to merely avoiding negative effects (Flynn, Young, & Barnett, 2015 p.11). Assessing the intended and actual blended value created is an important part of impact investing.