adaptive management

Adapting evaluation in the time of COVID-19 - Part 1: MANAGE

Alice Macfarlan's picture 21st April 2020 by Alice Macfarlan

Organisations around the world are quickly having to adapt their programme and project activities to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences. We’re starting a new blog series to help support these efforts. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be exploring some of the key issues and questions to be addressed. We’ll be structuring these around the seven clusters of tasks in the BetterEvaluation Rainbow Framework: MANAGE, DEFINE, FRAME, DESCRIBE, UNDERSTAND CAUSES, REPORT AND SUPPORT USE. We’ll also be creating a complementary thematic area on the BetterEvaluation website to gather this information and associated resources in a more permanent and accessible manner. We see this as a work in progress – new guidance and resources are being developed rapidly as the evaluation community comes together to support one another in this global crisis.

Complexity evaluation framework: Recognising complexity & key considerations for complexity-appropriate evaluation in the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA)

Defra (the UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) commissioned CECAN (the Centre for Evaluation Complexity Across the Nexus) to deliver a Complexity Evaluation Framework (CEF). The primary purpose of this framework is to equip Defra commissioners of evaluation (which may include analysts and policy makers), with a checklist of core considerations to ensure that evaluations are robust and sufficiently consider the implications of complexity theory. The framework is intended to increase the use and usability of evaluation for both commissioned and internally-led evaluation across the department. The final output is intended to be an actionable complexity evaluation framework, accompanied by a supporting evidence report to be used as a resource in commissioning evaluation.

Outcome monitoring and learning in large multi-stakeholder research programmes: lessons from the PRISE consortium

This discussion paper outlines the key lessons to emerge from designing and applying an outcome monitoring system to the Pathways to Resilience in Semi-arid Economies (PRISE) project - a five-year, multi-country, multi-project and multi-partner research consortium that generated new knowledge about how economic development in semi-arid regions could be made more equitable and resilient to climate change. The aim of this system was to continuously capture, analyse and understand changes in stakeholder behaviour and actions around the research activities and results, and how these changes can ultimately lead to sustained shifts in policy and practice. 

Outcome monitoring in large multi-stakeholder research programmes: Lessons from PRISE

Tiina Pasanen and Kaia Ambrose's picture 18th June 2019 by Tiina Pasanen and Kaia Ambrose

This guest blog by Tiina Pasanen and Kaia Ambrose discusses how the Pathways to Resilience in Semi-arid Economies (PRISE) project approached the challenge of coming up with an outcome monitoring system that considered the dynamics and complexities involved in a multi-project, multi-country and multi-partner research consortium and shares some key lessons to come out of this. Feature image credit: Lancelot Ehode Soumelong.

Iterative Design and Monitoring for Adaptive Management: How Causal Link Monitoring can help

Heather Britt Richard Hummelbrunner and Jackie Green's picture 26th September 2018 by Heather Britt Richard Hummelbrunner and Jackie Green

Development actors are embracing the concept and practice of adaptive management, using evidence to inform ongoing revisions throughout implementation. In this guest blog, Heather Britt, Richard Hummelbrunner and Jackie Greene discuss a practical approach that donors and partners can use to agree on what’s most important to monitor as a project continues to evolve. 

Learning to Make All Voices Count - Leveraging Complexity-Aware MEL to Pursue Change in Complex Systems​


Global Integrity, in collaboration with Making All Voices Count, has compiled material from the Learning to Make All Voices Count program, in which they worked with six partners in five countries, and supported their efforts to develop and apply an adaptive, learning-centered approach to strengthening subnational citizen engagement in their contexts. There is a focus on complexity-aware MEL as a crucial component of this approach.